Sorry!! The article you are trying to read is not available now.
Thank you very much;
you're only a step away from
downloading your reports.

The Origins of 10 Favorite Fast Food Restaurants

The surprising back-stories of America's most iconic eateries.

PrintPRINT
After taking in their belts a notch for the last three years, Americans are once again hungry for fast food. "The glow is off the idea that cooking is fun," says Ron Paul, president of Technomic, a research specialist. According to the latest industry figures, he adds, the $580 billion restaurant business is up across all sectors, from the cheap-and-cheerful to fine dining.

But while fast food is as deeply embedded in the American psyche as rock ‘n’ roll, V8s, and television, what do we really know about the origins of our favorite joints? For instance, who knew that Taco Bell was created as an afterthought? Or that In-N-Out pioneered the two-way speaker system and gave us the modern drive-through? Just who are the Five Guys who invented President Obama's first choice in a burger?

Chow down on these fascinating morsels exploring the origins of America’s fast food industry.

Taco Bell
Taco Bell
Introduced as a side business, the Mexican menu was never supposed to run the show.
By Justin Rohrlich
Starbucks
Starbucks
Brew coffee on the premises? Not us, said the college students who first launched this shop.
By Danielle Beurteaux
Five Guys
Five Guys
Are there really five guys? Yes...and no.
By Danielle Beurteaux
White Castle
White Castle
The man who launched this "royal" house was first to make burgers respectable. Seriously.
By Ryan Goldberg
Chik-Fil-A
Chik-Fil-A
The "Dwarf Grill" became an industry giant by perfecting just one dish.
By Diane Bullock
In-N-Out Burger
In-N-Out Burger
Just what is an "Animal Style" burger, and why would God care?
By Mitchell Hall
Sonic Drive-In
Sonic
A former milkman heard a voice -- and it changed the drive-in business forever.
By Steve Burgess
Domino's
Domino's
A college drop-out from Michigan topped the pizza business -- but his brother missed out on the dough.
By Diane Bullock
McDonalds
McDonald's
The New Hampshire-born brothers arrived in Hollywood with $50 and "0" sold.
By Steve Burgess
Yoshinoya
Yoshinoya
Its signature "beef bowl" has been a working-class hero for more than 100 years.
By Matthew Mallon


No positions in stocks mentioned.

The information on this website solely reflects the analysis of or opinion about the performance of securities and financial markets by the writers whose articles appear on the site. The views expressed by the writers are not necessarily the views of Minyanville Media, Inc. or members of its management. Nothing contained on the website is intended to constitute a recommendation or advice addressed to an individual investor or category of investors to purchase, sell or hold any security, or to take any action with respect to the prospective movement of the securities markets or to solicit the purchase or sale of any security. Any investment decisions must be made by the reader either individually or in consultation with his or her investment professional. Minyanville writers and staff may trade or hold positions in securities that are discussed in articles appearing on the website. Writers of articles are required to disclose whether they have a position in any stock or fund discussed in an article, but are not permitted to disclose the size or direction of the position. Nothing on this website is intended to solicit business of any kind for a writer's business or fund. Minyanville management and staff as well as contributing writers will not respond to emails or other communications requesting investment advice.

Copyright 2011 Minyanville Media, Inc. All Rights Reserved.

PrintPRINT
 
Featured Videos

WHAT'S POPULAR IN THE VILLE