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The Dot-Com Crash, 10 Years Later

Remembering the Internet boom and bust, and looking ahead to what's next.

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The Dot Com Crash, Ten Years Later
It's been a full decade since investors reached the pinnacle of the high-flying dot-com era. On March 10, 2000, the NASDAQ peaked at 5132.52, marking the height of a market colored by all the hallmarks of a bubble: crowds of bullish analysts, valuations based on speculation rather than revenues, hundreds of "virtual" company duplicates, and would-be experts trading with the irrational faith that they'd see the end coming in time to cash out.

Our retrospective package looks back at the crash that followed, taking $5 trillion out of the market over two years. Here, we revisit the wrongheaded ideas, "new economy" language, and big personalities that helped fuel the fire.




Dot-Com Map: Who Should Have Died But Didn't
Who died, who didn't, and who deserved what they got.
by Minyanville Staff

Famous and Infamous Dot-commers: Where Are They Now?
They graced magazine covers and were worth billions. What happened next?
by Minyanville Staff

The Single Worst Dot-Com Ad Revisited
Ten years later, it’s still appalling.
by Justin Rohrlich

Where Tech Is Headed
A new decade defined by fickle tastes and digital freedom.
by Mike Schuster

My Year as a Dot-Com Paper Millionaire
Riding the IPO wave could make a person seasick.
by Laurie Petersen

Worst Buzzwords of the Boom
Remembering the annoying vocabulary from Silicon Valley circa 2000.
by Megan Barnett

Swinging Outside My Strike Zone
In early 2000, I briefly joined the leagues of traders making wild, overconfident pitches. Lesson learned.
by Todd Harrison

When Biotech Was the New Tech
Remembering 2000, when this sector was a considered a safety play.
by David Miller
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No positions in stocks mentioned.

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Copyright 2011 Minyanville Media, Inc. All Rights Reserved.

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