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Names of Porn Pirates and Their Favorite Titles Leaked Online

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DDOS ASSAULT 17: EXPOSED ROOT DIRECTORY
DailyFeed
With all the free streaming sites readily available and properly sorted by category and keyword, it's surprising that people still feel the need to pirate pornography. Well, to each his own, I guess. But those folks run the risk of being contacted and extorted by UK firm ACS:Law.

ACS:Law keeps an eye on IP addresses linked to illegal downloads and stores the users' information on its servers. From there, representatives obtain a court order demanding the internet provider reveal the users' names and contact info and blackmail them into paying the firm to keep quiet -- lest they reveal the illegal downloads to the authorities. Oh, and it rarely pays credence to accuracy and often targets users who never pirated anything in their lives. Nice, huh?

Naturally, fair use advocates and privacy fanatics regard groups like ACS:Law and the Australian Federation Against Copyright Theft with the most contempt and, in the name of a synchronized DDoS attack called Operation Payback, took down the websites of those two groups and roughly 8,000 others.

But when ACS:Law's IT team tried to recover its site, it reset the server without the necessary security or encryption -- leaving its backup archive for anyone and everyone to see. One industrious member found the files and discovered a backlog of ACS:Law's private emails and attachments. Among the correspondence: a list of 5,300 Sky subscribers, their names, their addresses, and the titles to pornographic films they've downloaded.

From there, the only choice this person had was to post it on BitTorrent tracker The Pirate Bay.

ACS:Law head Andrew Crossley spoke to BBC News following this leak and another which exposed the names of 8,000 other users the firm had on file. Once it was revealed by the UK's Information Commissioner that ACS:Law could face a half million pounds for both breaches, Crossley backpedaled on the authenticity of the list. "All our evidence does is identify an internet connection that has been utilized to share copyright work," he said.

He added, "In relation to the individual names, these are just the names and addresses of the account owner and we make no claims that they themselves were sharing the files."

Hmm, that's weird. Guilt doesn't seem to matter when he's extorting innocent people to pay a fine. And now the names of those innocent people are exposed.

Half a million pounds seems a little paltry now, doesn't it?
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