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NOT AN INFOGRAPHIC: Is the Infographic Bubble About to Burst?

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ANNALS OF GRAPHICAL REPRESENTATIONS
DailyFeed
When infographics about infographics start to appear, it's safe to say we're in the midst of an infographic bubble.


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And, when an infographic uses an infographic to list its sources, we can't be far from the top of the infographic market.



There are videos about infographics...



Infographic blogs, infographic generators...even infographics that teach us how to make infographics:


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Just a few years ago, infographics were practically non-existent:



Last May, FlowingData.com came up with a back-of-the-envelope calculation regarding the sudden ubiquity of the infographic, writing:

While in 2006 through 2008, there was never more than four infographics that went popular, there were 225 just last year. In January 2009 there were eight. In December 2009, there were 34. Now in 2010, there are just under 50 that go popular per month. ... At this rate, there will probably be over three times as many big infographics that go popular this year than in 2009.

Popular is one way of putting it, much in the same way you might describe freeways in Los Angeles or Venetian pigeons "popular."

We have infographics about the lifecycle of the potato, "the world's most resilient tuber":


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Infographics that provide in-depth tutorials on the prevalence, symptoms, and treatment of nail fungus:


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And infographics about things no one ever really needed an infographic about in the first place:


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The technicians among us might say the appearance of a Cheetos infographic is as telling as, say, the appearance of a Pets.com commercial during the Superbowl...


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...while the econ majors/poli sci minors out there might believe that when the White House starts communicating via infographics, it's all over:


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Of course, history is littered with examples of extremely effective non-visual communication, as well:

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