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Food Fight: Subway Hits Domino's with Cease-and-Desist

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In response, Domino's burns it to a crisp.

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Whether in corporate circles or rap battle royales, American consumers love a good feud. Especially when it's played out in a public forum.

So the folks over at notorious ad agency Crispin, Porter + Bogusky have pushed the envelope again: In a recent Domino's (DPZ) ad, CEO David Brandon puts a cease-and-desist order from rival chain Subway into a 450-degree oven - and burns it to a crisp.

The spot is the latest in Domino's campaign touting the pizza chain's new oven-baked sandwiches over Subway's. Citing an independent taste-test conducted by the company, the ads say subjects preferred Domino's by a margin of 2-to-1.



Though David Brandon -- chairman and CEO of Domino's -- claims to have gotten legal and network approval before making such claims, Subway CEO Jeff Moody contends that the study was too biased and flawed to be considered accurate. Specifically, Moody had 4 major points related to the taste test that should negate any results.

1. Only 3 sandwiches were involved in the study.

2. Moody says comparing Domino's Philly Cheese Steak to Subway's Steak and Cheese is improper, as the Subway sandwich isn't meant to be a substitute for a traditional cheesesteak. Moody offers his company's cheesesteak as the correct contender for cheesesteak comparison.

3. Moody notes that a Subway sandwich is made-to-order: If an independent subject has no control over a customizable sandwich, Moody says it gives Domino's an unfair advantage.

4. Finally, Moody hypothesizes that the Subway sandwiches were likely served cold, rather than immediately after preparation.

"This is as much fun as a good, old-fashioned school cafeteria food fight," Brandon said. "I think I did what any red-blooded American always wants to do with a letter from a lawyer: Burn it to a crisp."

Moody should realize that Americans also love public bickering - and that we can't wait to see Subway's response.
No positions in stocks mentioned.
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