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Stress Test: Newsweek

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Will the magazine's extreme makeover give it an edge against the competition?

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Forgoing the coverage it currently devotes to the news cycle, a rebooted Newsweek will focus exclusively on topics about which it can provide a unique take. "The drill of chasing the week's news to add a couple of hard-fought new details is not sustainable," said editor Jon Meacham in the New York Times.

Along with the revamped editorial focus, Newsweek, which is owned by the Washington Post Company (WPO), hopes to build a more upscale image and command a higher asking price.

But as the audience for print publications continues to dwindle, making the field even more competitive, how will the new Newssweek stack up against its rival glossies? Minyanville ordered a stress test to find out.



Format
Circulation
Contributors
Advertisers
Legacy
Newsweek:
Simply by switching to a heavier paper stock, the new Newsweek will achieve a more upscale look and feel while its staff expends less effort.
Newsweek:
The magazine projects a smaller circulation of 1.5 million as it looks to attract a more affluent reader willing to plunk down an additional $25 for a subscription.
Newsweek:
The new iteration will continue the grand tradition of Christopher Hitchens and George Will condemning everyone and everything you hold dear.
Newsweek:
The magazine hopes to convince upscale advertisers to showcase their wares next to in-depth coverage of Darfur.
Newsweek:
Jenny McCarthy graces cover, 1997.
The New Yorker:
News and cultural commentary set among inscrutable cartoons, pompous bon mots and overwhelming hubris.
The Economist:
Although The Economist prints just 1.3 million issues per week, it only takes 1 errant copy to make a reader appear infinitely smarter than he really is.
The Weekly Standard:
William Kristol does the same - without being bogged down by facts or racial sensitivity.
Seventeen:
All sponsors must meet the approval of the powerful scrunchie lobby.
Time:
Bono named Person of the Year, 2005.
Edge:
Newsweek
Edge:
The Economist
Edge:
Newsweek
Edge:
Newsweek
Edge:
Time
Newsweek The Economist Newsweek Newsweek Time
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