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Best of the Blogs: What Is France's True Debt to GDP Ratio?

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Minyanville's daily roundup of some of the best financial commentary from around the Web.

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This column highlights the most interesting and useful business and financial commentary from around the Web each day. Use our comments section to post your own suggestions for blog content that you've read or written.

Zero Hedge
Link: The True French Debt To GDP: 146%
"In my continuing attempt to debunk what the European Union presents as facts; I turn my attention to France. I have already given you the correct debt to GDP ratios for Spain, Italy, Portugal and Germany which follows the exact principles of what any corporation in America or Europe would be mandated to report or suffer the slings and arrows of being held accountable for Fraud. I include contingent liabilities, derivatives, promises to pay, various guarantees and all of the normal accounting practices to be considered on any balance sheet except the sovereign nations of Europe. In the end, of course, it is your decision but at least we can begin any consideration based upon the facts and not based upon a fictitious account." (Also Read Big Three French Banks' Assets Triple France's GDP, Says David Stockman.)

Bits
"The digital age has us living in a perpetual and pervasive popularity contest. Leader boards, top 10 lists, most-liked posts and most-clicked search results define what is successful in business and culture. Amazon's lists of the top-selling electronics, top-selling books, or top-selling electronic books, each with subcategories, tell us what to buy. The top choices of a Google results list are the ones we click on, never the ones at the bottom of the page. Being at the top of these lists can generate substantial windfalls. The iTunes App Store, where apps like Angry Birds, Words With Friends and Pages have spent months at the top of the charts, help the app makers collect hundreds of thousands of dollars in revenue, while those who cannot get that visibility founder in obscurity."
All Things D
"Apple might end up making a really great TV set. But if Tim Cook ends up giving you the same TV programming you're already paying for, at the same price, will you pay a premium for his box? That's the scenario Barclays analyst Anthony DiClemente sketches out in a new note. He figures that Apple could certainly come up with a cool piece of hardware - he imagines one that looks like a "large-scale iPad" - that would tie together the Internet with Apple's existing suite of iOS apps and services." (For related content, see The Biggest Problem for Apple TV and Friends.)
Epicenter
"I have noticed that over the years, Google has gravitated from small tricks to elaborate presentations of outlandishly extravagant initiatives, often having to do with artificial intelligence. Supposedly the joke was that people might be inclined to believe that Google was unveiling stuff that was many years away from reality. But the real joke was that even the scariest plans that Google joked about were the kind of thing that Google's leaders actually dreamed about. In that sense, Google makes fun of itself. Sort of." (Also read Google in Trouble Over Auto-Complete, Again.)
Real Time Economics
"Is China's manufacturing sector rebounding strongly or continuing to contract? A look at the Purchasing Managers Index data for March, published Sunday, provides mixed messages.The semi-official China Federation of Logistics and Purchasing's PMI suggests the economy is bouncing back. A reading of 53.1 in March is up strongly from 51.0 in February and some way above the 50 mark that separates growth from contraction. Contrast that with the HSBC Markit PMI, which came in at 48.3, down from 49.6 in February, and suggesting the manufacturing sector is contracting at an accelerating rate. What to make of the conflicting signals?"

Twitter: @Minyanville

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