Sorry!! The article you are trying to read is not available now.
Thank you very much;
you're only a step away from
downloading your reports.

Best of the Blogs: Among Governments, US Is the Largest Receiver of Information From Google

By

Plus, Microsoft is expected to introduce its new tablet later today.

PrintPRINT
This column highlights the most interesting and useful business and financial commentary from around the Web each day. Use our comments section to post your own suggestions for blog content that you've read or written.

All Things D
Link: Google's Most Active Big Brother Is the US Government

"What's the nation most likely to ask Google (GOOG) to take down user content or hand over user data? The United States, and increasingly so.

"The US government asked Google to hand over user data 6,321 times in the second half of 2011, an increase of 37% from the same period in 2010.

"With 12,243 users and accounts specified, the US had far more requests than any other country.

"Google complied with the US 93% of the time - the highest rate of compliance the company reported as part of a regular update to its 'Transparency Report.'"

ZDNet
Link: What a Microsoft tablet needs to compete with the iPad

"As many of you know, rumors have been flying around lately that Microsoft (MSFT) is about to announce its own tablet at some secret squirrel event, but not just any tablet, no; many speculate that it's going to be an 'iPad killer.' Every time I read that, I can't help but shake my head and giggle a bit - not because I think it's a fruitless sentiment (no pun intended), but because of the landscape that lays before *any* company hoping to dethrone (never mind hold a candle to) Apple (AAPL) in the tablet space."

The Wall Street Journal: Deal Journal
Link: Morgan Stanley Made a Bundle on Facebook Deal

"Morgan Stanley (MS) and its lead banker Michael Grimes held the steering wheel on Facebook, as WSJ colleagues reported in new detail this morning.

"Grimes and the bank ran the investor meetings and had the inner ear of Facebook's (FB) CFO David Ebersman, and the bank was compensated for that.

"As WSJ reported, the fee structure on Facebook's filing was somewhat unusual. Morgan Stanley got 38.5% of the fees, while JPMorgan (JPM) got just over 20% and Goldman Sachs (GS) got 15%, not exactly the typical split for a deal with three underwriters."

The New York Times: DealBook
Link: Dealing With the Facebook Lawsuits

"The campy 1980s hit 'It's Raining Men' could well be translated into a new song called 'It's Raining Lawsuits' to describe the deluge of cases triggered by Facebook's botched initial public offering on May 18.

"In response to more than 40 lawsuits, the company filed a brief last Thursday asking to consolidate most of the cases filed in federal and state courts in New York and California against the company, its directors and underwriters and Nasdaq into one proceeding. By putting all the lawsuits together before a single judge, Facebook can try to get a handle on the unwieldy mass of legal claims.

"While this motion is standard when there are multiple lawsuits, the content is far from typical, as with many things about Facebook. The company seems to be using the motion to address some of the negative publicity cast on it about the I.P.O. by arguing that it disclosed everything it should have to investors, and the party really responsible for the precipitous drop in its share price was Nasdaq."

The Big Picture
Link: Unless & Except...

"Yeah! The Greeks Voted!

"For the Xn-th time, important events took place in Europe that either did or did not resolve an impending crisis, one that is either imminent or not.

"This was absolutely and unequivocally crucial, unless it didn't matter at all. Either of which is an equally likely outcome.

"Indeed, this past week was absolutely critical, except that it wasn't. The Greek elections determining their future relationship to the eurozone was simply of the utmost importance, unless, as it turns out, it was not.

"Yes, they did not matter; No, it was quite important. Unless it was the other way around. In which case it did/didn't was/wasn't important."

Twitter: @ChrisWitrak
< Previous
  • 1
Next >
No positions in stocks mentioned.
PrintPRINT

Busy? Subscribe to our free newsletter!

Submit
 

WHAT'S POPULAR IN THE VILLE