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Best of the Blogs: Is This How the Apple TV Will Work?

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Plus, Credit Suisse will reduce the size of its European investment banking deparment.

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This column highlights the most interesting and useful business and financial commentary from around the Web each day. Use our comments section to post your own suggestions for blog content that you've read or written.

All Things D
Link: Here's How an Apple TV Could Actually Work (Video)

"Jeremy Allaire is a big fan of the "pay attention to the software, not the hardware" school of Apple (AAPL) TV speculation. As the Brightcove (BCOV) CEO explained earlier this month, he thinks a core part of any Apple TV plan will be Airplay-enabled apps that allow iPhones and iPads to control and interact with your flat-screen.

"The nice part about that prediction is that it doesn't require us to wait around to see what Tim Cook eventually delivers - you can see what that looks like right now."

The New York Times: DealBook
Link: Credit Suisse Said to Plan New Round of Layoffs in Europe

"The Swiss bank Credit Suisse (CS) is planning to further reduce the size of its European investment banking department, according to a person with direct knowledge of the matter.

"Credit Suisse, which announced plans last year to eliminate 3,500 jobs as part of an overhaul of its worldwide operations, may reduce the work force in its European investment banking division by as much as 30 percent, said the person, who spoke on the condition of anonymity because he was not authorized to speak publicly."

The Wall Street Journal: China Real Time Report
Link: Shanghai's Tokyo Moment

"As Shanghai ponders how to take its place as a global financial center alongside London and New York, a good example may be Tokyo – at least in terms of what to avoid.

"Like Shanghai is today, Tokyo in the 1980s was a focal point for the world's No. 2 global economy, and striving toward international financial-center status. Its banks were bulging with cash and extending tentacles world-wide. Foreign financial firms were starting to put their regional headquarters in Tokyo, seeking deposits from high-saving locals and making designs on its future as a global investor.

"These days, Shanghai–which is gearing up for the Liujiazui Forum, a key annual financial meeting that kicks off later this week–is getting that kind of attention. A two-year-old central-government policy calls the east coast city the preferred financial center for China and aims to elevate its global status by 2020."

The Financial Times: BeyodnBRICS
Link: Morgan Stanley: hunt the dividend

"When analysts starting talking up dividends, it's a sure sign of a bear market, not least in emerging markets.

"But it's also a reminder that over the very long term – 50 years and more – dividends have contributed about half the total return on equities. They may do so again, assuming that the glorious years of out-sized capital gains are now well and truly over.

"As Morgan Stanley (MS) points out in a report this week, this may be a good time to start chasing dividend income, including in emerging markets[.]"

VentureBeat
Link: Yammer & Microsoft: industry reaction now that the deal is done

"Yesterday, after half a month of speculation, Microsoft (MSFT) announced that it purchased Yammer for $1.2 billion. According to Charles River Partners, the first venture capital firm to invest in Yammer, that's the second largest all-cash deal for a VC-backed company, ever.

"VentureBeat has been reaching out to industry sources - and the original Yammer investor, George Zachary - asking what this deal means for the enterprise social market. Here's what we're hearing."

Twitter: @ChrisWitrak
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