The Post-Hurricane and Pre-Election Financial Markets

By Todd Harrison  NOV 05, 2012 10:20 AM

Seeking normalcy, one step at a time.

 


MINYANVILLE ORIGINAL

Editor's Note: Todd posts his vibes in real time each day on our Buzz & Banter.

“Power to the People”
-- John Lennon

I found an Internet signal late last week and shared Crisis Mode, With an Eye on Normalcy. It was all I could do to update my team -- and the world -- as to what was happening in my neck of the woods.

I will try not to dwell on the Superstorm Sandy, as per the title above, we must look "up and out" rather than "down and back." I will, however, share some observations from Port Washington, Long Island, which is where I live (having recently moved from NYC) and where many continue to suffer. This is day seven of no power or heat at our home and we may only be at the halfway point, according to some best-guess estimates.

Despite well-intentioned assurances from readers in the Gulf Coast ("Don't worry, this is a run-of-the-mill Cat-1 Hurricane, not the Cat-4s we're used to doing here"), I knew it was bad when I looked at our backyard last Monday, before the storm officially hit, to find several of our largest trees pulled out of the ground, roots and all (the roots alone were about 10 feet high). In total, we lost seven or eight trees but they miraculously missed the house and by extension, my family, and that is all that matters.  A wise man once told me never to cry about something that can be replaced.

While we were in the process of installing a large generator, we had not done so by the time the storm hit. We are lucky to have a small gas generator which is still being used to power a spare fridge and a space heater. We also have a fireplace, which helps on the margin, although nothing prepared my wife and I for what we awoke to see last Wednesday morning: Ruby Jett, our 17-month-old gem of a daughter, was a pale shade of blue, and her hands and feet were freezing cold.

We bundled her up and shipped her to a relative across town who somehow had power turned on that morning; mission accomplished on the little one, at least in terms of health and welfare. That left us with our eight-year-old twins, who were troopers throughout but scared nonetheless. As luck would have it, one of my college fraternity brothers lives three houses away with a full generator; as our kids are friends who go to the same elementary school, they provided much needed warmth and shelter.  Brotherhood indeed.

This story would be incomplete if I didn't share a random act of kindness from an old-school Minyan who was staying in Amagansett, Long Island. He reached out through Twitter (when I was in the hot spot) to tell me that he was "well stocked" and getting power back that day. He arranged for a care package to be delivered to our home: 15 gallons of gasoline, a freezer full of food, and baby meds (Ruby had a double ear infection through all of this). It was only yesterday I learned that he and his family never got power back, although they thankfully arrived in a powered-up NYC last night.

Thank you for your incredible generosity Michael, on behalf of my family. I filled our generator this morning with your gasoline, which was the only fuel we currently have access to.  To say, “I owe you one,” doesn’t quite capture my gratitude.

I've seen my fair share of crisis but nothing, save perhaps 9/11, comes close to the destruction I've seen over the last week. The good news -- and yes, there is good news -- is that the human spirit shines bright in the face of hardship and the largest obstacles provide the most profound opportunities. I will ask all of you to join me in sending white light to those who continue to suffer -- the elderly, the hungry, the homeless -- and our sincere gratitude to the first responders and line-workers who have traveled from Canada, Alabama, and other regions to assist in the long road to repair.

As my grandfather would say, "this too shall pass."

Some Random Thoughts:
R.P.

Twitter: @todd_harrison

No positions in stocks mentioned.